Financial assistance and the Companies Act

A3_BOne of the more significant changes that the “new” Companies Act, 71 of 2008, brought about was that a company may now provide financial assistance to prospective shareholders to subscribe for shares in that company. In other words, it may lend persons money to enable them to subscribe for shares in the lender (although other forms of financial assistance is also contemplated – see below). Previously, in terms of section 38 of the now repealed Companies Act, 61 of 1973, this was not allowed.

In terms of section 44 of the “new” Companies Act, financial assistance by a company would include extending a loan, guarantee or the providing of security to enable a person to obtain funding for purposes of acquiring shares in that company. Section 44 seeks to regularise such instances of financial assistance however, and this would extend beyond the mere granting of a loan to a would-be shareholder. The wide definition of “financial assistance” makes it clear that the section covers various scenarios and also specifically where financial assistance by a company is provided to anyone not only for the purpose of enabling him or her to subscribe for shares in that company, but also if the assistance is to enable shares to be acquired in a related company.

The purpose of the provision is quite clearly to protect existing shareholders. For example: if a company were to lend money to a prospective shareholder who is subsequently unable to repay the assisting company, that company would have effectively diluted the shareholding interests of the existing shareholders (who would have paid cash for their shares), whilst the new shareholder who is unable to repay the company still has an interest left in the company (and indirectly therefore to the cash subscription proceeds of the other shareholders).

Notwithstanding the potential negative effect of allowing shares to be subscribed for in a company on loan account, it is foreseeable that such financial assistance may be required from time to time for genuine commercial purposes and transactions that would otherwise not have been feasible. B-BBEE transactions are an excellent example of this.

For a company to give financial assistance to a would-be shareholder, the directors of the company must be satisfied that the financial assistance is fair and reasonable to the company, and further that the company will be solvent and liquid thereafter. They must also ensure that this is not in contravention of the company’s Memorandum of Incorporation. If in breach of any of these conditions, the directors may potentially be held personally liable. Typically, the shareholders of the company must also approve thereof by way of a special resolution.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

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